How to Spot Fraudulent Online Freelance Writing Jobs on Popular Sites Like Craigslist

If you're new to freelance writing, not only can it be difficult to tell a legitimate job from a scam, it can be downright impossible. This is because online freelance writing jobs scams are evolving. Like all criminals, the scumbags behind them evolve as more and more people become hip to their methods. So, how can you protect yourself? How can you avoid being taken advantage of? Following are three ways to do so.

1. Look for Contact Information: Not only should you look for it, but try contacting the company via the methods they provide.

While many companies post anonymously on sites like Craigslist to avoid being bombarded by job seekers, sometimes a legitimate company will get back to you to at least acknowledge receipt of your materials if you apply.

Scam companies, on the other hand, may contact you with "offers," eg, sign up for our membership site for only $ 2.95 / month; subscribe to get job leads delivered directly to your inbox for only $ 1.95 / month. Once they have access to your account, they'll usually debit your account for anywhere from $ 40 to $ 97 per month or more – every month.

2. Look for Details: Speaking of presenting materials, scam companies operate at both ends of the spectrum – either they'll ask you for specific things up front, or they'll ask you for very little. It all depends on what their scam is.

Some want free content, so they may request "original" writing samples; others want money, so they'll just ask you to send in specific (sparse) info so they can get your contact info and spam you later with their fraudulent offers.

3. Bulk Content Requests: If a company contacts you with a large content order, and won't pay a certain percentage up front, they're probably a scam. Their game is to get free content.

I'm an SEO writer. One day, I received an email from a company wanting 40 articles. I don't remember what it was on. They provided me with a keyword list and asked when I could complete the order. I said within 3 days and that we require a 50 percent deposit to get started. They balked; I walked.

Many times, companies will say that they'll pay you after you've completed a certain number of articles. Only, you never hear from them after you've delivered the initial content.

There are more ways to spot online freelance writing jobs scams, eg, if they ask for money for job leads, or if they ask you to submit "original samples" for no pay, etc. Just do your due diligence and if it doesn't sit right with you – for whatever reason – go with that. Don't talk yourself into something. Your subconscious is at work here. Listen to it.

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Offshore Jobs – What Does It Mean To You And Why Should You Care?

What are offshore jobs? What do people mean when they talk about offshore jobs? Well, different people mean different thing when they use this phrase. At its broadest meaning, offshore jobs means any job which is not on the mainland of wherever you are staying. It could mean a job on an offshore oil rig or it could mean a job on some island belonging to another country. For someone residing in the US, a job in the Cayman Islands or Singapore would be offshore, and so would a job on an oil rig just off the coast of one of the Gulf states.

Why should it matter? For two reasons, really. The first is taxation. There are certain laws in the US meant to encourage citizens to take on hardship or risky postings out of the border. If your lawyer and accountant agree that your job falls under this category, you may be able to get a pretty hefty tax deduction. At one point of time, you could deduct up to $ 80,000 per annum. If you were a roustabout working on a deep sea oil rig and earning $ 80,000 per year, this meant you did not need to pay any income taxes at all. Obviously, you'll need to check with your lawyer and accountant and get them to do the appropriate paperwork.

The second important reason is that an offshore job typically pays better than its equivalent onshore job. You'll get paid more as a driller on a deep sea oil rig than a driller on an onshore oil rig. Same with the support jobs like electricians and mechanics. The offshore pay is much better, especially nowadays when the entire oil industry is facing a severe shortage of warm bodies to crew their new oil rigs.

So why do oil companies pay more for offshore work? From the economics point of view, it is a simple matter of demand and supply. Right now, oil prices are high and getting higher. Most of the oil is under the ocean, so oil companies are desperately building offshore oil rigs and deep sea oil rigs. While robots work okay in the limited confines of a factory, oil rigs still can't be automated. They still need human crew to operate them. Hence the great demand for workers. Unfortunately for the oil companies, the people who have the qualities needed to work on an offshore oil rig are pretty scarce. You need to have a combination of guts, brains and physical strength. Not many people have all three. So we have high demand and low supply, which results in sky-high pay. Someone who is basically a laborer can earn more than the director of a small company.

Apart from that, an offshore oil rig is considered a hard and potentially dangerous posting. You need to keep this in mind while the dollar signs are dancing in front of your eyes. While modern rigs are undoubtedly safer than the oil rigs 50 years ago, you should remember that working in the middle of the ocean can get quite exciting when there is a major storm going on around you … or an earthquake, or a tsunami ( if you are just off the coast).

Now you should have a better idea of ​​what people mean when they talk about offshore jobs and why it should matter to you.

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Offshore Oil Rig Jobs – No Experience – How Do I Get Started

The oil industry is booming right now, with many offshore oil rig jobs needed to crew the new drilling rigs. Top economists project the oil boom to last the next 14 to 20 years, which will likely lead to oil jobs outstripping financial and IT jobs. While many people are puzzled about how to get started, the truth is that if you are young, fit, hardworking and willing to get your hands dirty, you should have no trouble getting started.

If you do not have any experience, the best way to get started is to get a job on a land-based oil rig. You can get hired as a roustabout, basically a general laborer, work hard for 6 months and climb up the ladder to the position of roughneck. As a roughneck, you will still do a lot of manual labor, but you may also have a chance to supervise a few roustabouts and help out the more specialized positions like the derrickhands and drillers. Show the right attitude, work hard and you may find yourself promoted all the way up to driller (2nd highest rank on the oil rig) in 5 years.

A university degree is not very useful on board an oil rig. On the other hand, a useful technical certificate or diploma, for example as an electrician or mechanic, could land you a job in the motor room or electrical department. These are not the only useful trade skills on board an offshore oil rig. The rig crew need to eat, so a good cook is always welcome on board. A medic also plays a valuable part on the rig. Despite modern technology, an oil rig job is still a pretty hazardous place to work in. Accidents happen, and a medic always has work to do.

An important point to keep in mind is that an offshore oil rig is covered under maritime law. Hence, it is good if you take the trouble to get a basic working knowledge of how it will affect you. Besides this, there are vaccinations and skills certifications specific to where the oil rig is located. For example, in the UK you need to take an offshore survival and firefighting course. Different Canadian provinces have their own First Aid certifications. And different US states have their own requirements.

As you can see, there is no secret to getting started in offshore oil rig jobs . Just start small, on shore, from the bottom. Once you prove yourself, you can move to the more lucrative offshore drilling rigs.

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Common Issues Applicants Make When Searching For Jobs

As soon as individuals finish their education, they need to look for jobs in order to accommodate their needs. Surely, there are numerous job opportunities, but there are also a lot of applicants who are seeking for jobs. In addition, some applicants encounter issues that can make their search worse. To avoid these issues, below are some of the mistakes individuals need to know.

Incomplete application. One of the most common mistakes of applicants when searching for jobs is they sometimes have an incomplete application. As of now, there are numerous individuals who seek for jobs in order to accommodate their needs. Because of this, employers meticulously check their information. Because of this, having an incomplete application can be a huge problem since employers cannot determine if you have the right skills and knowledge for the job they offer. To avoid this, make sure that you provide complete and accurate information in your application.

Wrong attire. The next issue that applicants encounter and searching for jobs is they go to interviews with the wrong attire. Some business experts state that apart from the right mindset and skills, attires are important when applying for a job since you need to make a good impression to the employer. By wearing the right attire, you can have better chances in getting a job than individuals who wear shirts and jeans.

Not following instructions. Another mistake that individuals make when looking for jobs is they do not follow instructions. There are some cases when employers have certain requirements applicants need to follow. And, following these instructions are important to allow employers determine if you can be a good member of their company. Sadly, simple requirements are frequently neglected by individuals which is the reason why they are not hired.

Forgetting about your background. As mentioned above, there are numerous job opportunities individuals can opt for. However, some individuals cross the line due to the stiff competition. Unfortunately, applying for a job not related to your skills and knowledge can be hard. So, make sure that you stay on your field to allow you to get job more efficiently.

Neglecting to opt for staffing services. Finally, some individuals also neglect to opt for staffing services. Some individuals think that opting for such service can be expensive. Not to mention, individuals also think that staffing services can only benefit employers. But, the truth is, staffing companies allow applicants to find the best job position for them. This is possible since they have a wide list of employers in different industries. Not to mention, some service providers also offer training programs to help applicants find jobs more efficiently.

These are only some of the mistakes applicants need to be aware of to make their job search easier and more successful.

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Jobs on the Road For the Vagabonds

In order to sustain and maintain traveling accessories and equipment, the vagabond with a small or even non existing bank account, may sometimes find themselves stopping over to earn payment for services. The form and amount of payment may depend on the specific job, but as long as the vagabond can attain enough resources to continue trekking, any job will do.

Because of their non materialistic and efficient lifestyle, most vagabonds won't usually need to find a source of income. But in times of hardship and when resources get scarce (like worn out shoes), money can always be obtained to provide for whatever a traveler may need. More elaborateate vagabonds usually have higher traveling cost to maintain and provide fuel for RVs, trailers, wagons, campers, towing vehicles, and other expenses attached to motorized traveling. The vagabonds with larger wagons, typically travel in groups, some having family members sharing one RV, or a caravan of many RVs of other nomads, gypsies, wanderers, drifters, and tramps.

Opportunities for the Vagabond Below is a list of various fields of work that a traveler can look for, all depending on how long the traveler is willing to stay in one area, there is always work to be found anywhere your wheels or feet take you.

Seasonal jobs sites: Jobs are available everywhere you go. Farms (crop pickers, equipment operators, animals to tend), Amusement Parks (maintenance, sales, promotions, services), Cruise Ships (cooking, hosting, housekeeping, travel guide), Outdoorsman Camp (fishing, hunting, guides), Training Centers (teaching, organizing), Construction Sites (skilled trades, labor), Tradeshows (sales, promotions, bartering, great place to sale stuff), Tourist Sites, Campgrounds (office work, reservations, sales, grounds maintenance, handy-person, housekeeping , running social activities), Property Owners (house sitting, gardening, pet sitting, landscaping), Tax Centers (having ability to do tax returns. Get trained and go to work remotely or at a local tax form preparation office.)

Skill-Specific Work: A skilled worker is any worker who has some special skill, knowledge, or (usually acquired) ability in his work. A skilled worker may have attended a college, university or technical school. Or, a skilled worker may have learned his skills on the job. Skilled Labor (equipment operator, carpenter, mason, electrician, plumber, painter, etc.), Consulting (providing specialist advice to other people who work in the same field) Teaching, Personal Care, Property Management

Wagon based work: It is just like a home based job, however with today's communication technology, a vagabond can work out of his RV. Some mobile communications gadgets are required, for example mobile phone and fax machine, laptop, portable printer and scanner, etc … Publishing, Sales, Marketing

Vagabond Jobs

Descriptions

Recreational Activities Worker: Plan, organize, and direct activities in local playgrounds and recreation areas, parks, community centers, religious organizations, camp sites, theme parks, and tourist attractions. Performers, Event Planners, Sports Coordinators, Fishermen and Hunters, etc …

Property

Caretaker: Property Care for financial compensation, and sometimes in exchange for rent-free living accommodations. Ranch Sitters, Bed & Breakfast and Inn Sitters, Property Managers, Estate Managers, Hosts, Mechanics, Electricians, Cooks, Landscapers, Farmers and Gardeners, House Sitters, etc …

Personal

Caregiver: Someone with health care skills, who is employed to care for another person or pets, can look for jobs like. Pet Walkers, Teachers, Pet Groomers, Caterers, House Cleaners, Nurses, Hair Stylist, etc …

Mystery Shopper: Mystery shopping or Mystery Consumer is a tool used by market research companies to measure quality of retail service or gather specific information about products and services. Mystery shoppers posing as normal customers perform specific tasks-such as purchasing a product, asking questions, registering complaints or behaving in a certain way – and then provide detailed reports or feedback about their experiences

Travel Guide / Agent: Provide travel related services for weary travelers such guides, tours, and travel arrangements. Travel agent, Host, Tour Guide, etc …

Publisher / Writer / Producer: Making information available for public view and getting paid for it can be a vagabond's source of income. Using the internet to publish blogs, tips, articles, stories, even novels could be a rewarding way of getting money for the traveler, since there is no need to stop over.

Online Entrepreneur: Every day more and more entrepreneurs are building successful businesses using the internet. There is an abundance of opportunity online and depending on the venture; There is often less cost and risk involved when compared with traditional businesses.

Traditional Business: Small business can be operated out of an RV, such as selling a product or service in return for money or other means of compensation.

Paid Online Surveys: You can earn money just for sharing your opinion; It's a fun and easy way to make some money help for some travel expenses. Sign up on the following websites to start some surveys that pay now. http://www.SurveySavvy.com

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Welding Jobs And Low Pay: (And 3 Things Can You Do About It Now)

The average welder is now 56 years old.

Young people are not becoming welders because the welding shop in school has been replaced by a computer room (which is crazy, because welding is the glue that holds our world together).

At the same time, a real and sustained boom is beginning in the USA for many reasons – a boom that will last 20 years – a boom that will be screaming out for (and paying big bucks for) welders. Why will the boom happen? What can you do to make $ 100 an hour? Why are welding wages still so low? Get the answers here.

What is good about welding?

Welding is one of a few crafts or trade crafts that can be used in a long list of other trade crafts and locations that don't usually come to mind. For example: I started welding at 13 to repair motorcycles and cars.

At age 19 I was building gates (gates that are still there and beautiful 40 years later). I became an industrial electrician and welded as an electrician. Artist use welding.

Injection molds used to made plastic parts, are repaired by welders. Stainless piping in food grade factories are installed and repaired by welders. And there are some welders who make $ 100 an hour doing these and other specialties in the welding industry …

Why are the prospects better than ever for welders?

The boom is under way. It is the oil and gas boom – oil is being extracted by new technologies is such large volumes, the USA is once again the # 1 world producer.

Manufacturing is coming BACK to the USA.

The 3D Printer and other new technologies and the cost of labor in China: it is driving manufacturing home for good. By 2020 the hourly rate for a Chinese worker will be $ 6.43 an hour.

China will soon more expensive than the USA for Manufacturing.

Few people understand that American workers are 3 times more efficient than Chinese workers. Add in the cost of shipping to the USA and it is easy to see why the US will add 2,000,000 (two million) manufacturing jobs by 2020.

What 3 things can you do to make sure you are a highly paid welder?

Highly Paid Welder Action One:

Start or upgrade your welding career by mastering the hardest and oldest welding process FIRST. Stick or SMAW (Shielded Metal Arc Welding) is about 100 years old and is the hardest process to master. It came into it's own during World War Two because it was adapted to ship building – it allowed Kaiser Steel to build a new ship every 3 days – no wonder the Germans lost!

In some circles, stick welding is considered to be a Dinosaur. Don't listen to that! It is easy to set up and very portable. It is extremely durable because it is simple. It can be used in a light breeze – most other processes cannot. It can weld just about anything. And you will have more opportunities to earn more money.

Highly Paid Welder Action Two:

Discover welding pipe with stick. Pipe welders are the king of the hill in welding. They make the most money – and they do it for the least work. Don't get me wrong, pipe welders work hard. However, good pipe welders don't prepare pipe. They don't grind. There skill is valuable enough that they often sit in the truck until the next joint is ready. They can't be risking injury doing anything less than welding pipe.

Highly Paid Welder Action Three:

Get your own rig. A welding rig is a truck with a welder on it. A good rig includes all the supporting tools, cable reels and more. A welder with a rig is a rig welder. A rig welder will make more money because companies will rent your rig and employ you at the same time. Rig welders generally earn $ 65 to $ 150 an hour.

Being a rig welder is also a flexible move.

Think about it – a welder without a rig (welders without a rig are called a "single handers") can also accept work as a single hander – they just park their rig and weld with the company welder if that is how the job is structured . However, when a company needs to rent rigs, a rig welder is the best solution – and the welder who owns a rig can fill the bill. The opposite is not true (obviously). A single hand welder who does not own a rig cannot take a job as a rig welder.

What is the other advantage to becoming a rig welder?

Managing a rig (maintenance, repair and care) starts any welder into the world of "You Inc" – into thinking logistically and strategically about welding – almost like a business. Why is business management a benefit?

A welder who can manage him or herself (as well as a laborer or two and a welder's helper) can contract on any federal installation (such as a military base). No contractor license is required. It is not uncommon for a welder who is contracting to make $ 1,000 a day.

WHY is the pay so low for so many welders?

The low pay many welders experience is associated with MIG welding. MIG is often utilized in factory situations where trailers or lifts or custom construction trucks are made (for example). Why is the pay so low for MIG welders?

Here's why: If you walk into a factory and apply for a job and you interview well – and they have a vacancy for a welder – they may train you to be a MIG welder in one day.

Typically, any skill that can be learned in one day will not pay well.

With that said, I don't want to run down MIG or MIG welders in this article. MIG is an awesome process. The low end of the MIG pay scale involves a welder making the same simple, non-critical welds over and over (and you can see why the pay is low).

Conclusion:

A certified structural MIG welder is worth more money than a person welding after a day of training in a factory. Sadly, even the skilled and certified MIG welder will not earn a lot of money. Stick pipe welding must be mastered – and when it is, a welder can earn $ 74,346 to $ 200,000 or more a year.

What should you do next?

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Baby Boomers Over Age of 50 Pushed Out of Jobs

New data released last month was disturbing for the 85% of baby boomers still working. Many don't have enough saved for retirement or simply aren't ready to leave the working world behind. Some say they plan to continue working into their 70's and even 80s, according to a 2017 report, America's Aging Workforce.

Unfortunately, new analysis by ProPublica and the Urban Institute published last month shows that the decision may not be up to them. Dismally, more than half of employees over the age of 50 are being pushed out of longtime jobs before they choose to retire. Most suffer financially and only one in 10 of these workers ever earns as much as they did before their employment setbacks.

Apparently, 50 is the new 65.

The analysis was based on data from the Health and Retirement Study that began tracking 20,000 people in 1992, from the time the participants turned 50 through the rest of their lives. The study focused on workers who entered their 50s with stable, full-time jobs, and who have been with the same employer for at least five years.

The results are sobering. According to the US Census Bureau, there are currently 40 million Americans age 50 and older who are working. That means, according to this study, that as many as 22 million of these people have or will suffer a layoff, forced retirement, or other involuntary job separation. Of these, only a little over 2 million have recovered financially – or ever will.

Unfortunately, this problem could be worse than we think. Jeffrey Wenger, a senior labor economist with the RAND Corp., claims some older people are likely laid off, but cover it up by saying they retired. "There's so much social stigma around being separated from work," he says, "even people who are fired or let go will say they retired to save face."

As a result, the steady earnings that many boomers count on in their 50s, 60s, and beyond to build up their retirement savings and ensure financial security often disappears.

"This isn't how most people think they're going to finish out their work lives," said Richard Johnson, an Urban Institute economist and veteran scholar of the older labor force who worked on the analysis. "For the majority of older Americans, working after 50 is considerably riskier and more turbulent than we previously thought."

What can older workers do?

You may be thinking, wait a minute. Isn't it illegal under the federal Age Discrimination in Employment Act for employers to treat older workers differently than younger ones? Yes, but employers can be sneaky about the way they fire older employees, Often phrases like "layoff" and "job elimination" are used as an excuse for age discrimination. No matter. You may have legal recourse and an age discrimination claim if:

– you experience a layoff and notice that less-qualified, younger employees at the
The same level are not being laid off.

– your company claims to be eliminating a job, but simply changes the title and puts
someone younger in the same position.

– You're being targeted for poor performance while younger employees doing the
same things aren't suffering any consequences.

In addition, there are some steps you can take to prevent being laid off. Although there are no guarantees, experts recommend the following strategies to enhance job security:

* A common myth concerning older workers is that people over 50 are rigid. You can prove this disparaging idea wrong by remaining flexible, resilient, and adaptable.

* Understand your company objectives and your boss's determinations, and then align your work performance with them. In other words, find ways to make your boss's job easier and make yourself indispensable.

* Do not contribute to the false belief that all old people are cranky and difficult. Be friendly, cooperative, and helpful. Makes sure management likes you and be the kind of person others enjoy working with and hanging around.

* Brag a little. Ensure that your boss knows about any improvements you've implemented, challenges you've overcome, and projects and goals you've completely successfully.

* Be careful not to give the impression that you lack initiative and are simply coasting along until retirement, which can make you vulnerable during a layoff. Make a point of continuously updating your skills and expanding your knowledge. Read journals, take courses, attend conferences, or attain additional certifications in your field.

Finally, while it's important for everyone to have emergency savings, if you're 50 or older, it's even more critical to have a strong financial safety net. Have enough savings on hand to ride out a potentially lengthy period of unemployment.

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Great First Jobs for Kids

I have long recommended that no parents give their children an allowance, rather I recommend they provide them commissions for certain household chores to help teach your kids that money comes from effort. At some point, many children begin to look for work outside the home to help augment their earnings and start to earn income that isn't reliant on Mom and Dad. First jobs are also great ways to learn about oneself and begin to learn about business. Here are several ideas for great first jobs for kids under age 16.

Paper Route – Many children cut their teeth waking up before dawn to deliver papers prior to going to school. Young people performing this work learn many of the mechanics and hiccups concerning the flow of goods from the factory to the consumer. One learns to push through challenges such as poor weather and supply problems to get the job done.

Babysitting – One of the most common first jobs for many (but not exclusively) girls is babysitting. Babysitting teaches responsibility, preparation, patience and safety not to mention dealing with the highly emotional expectations of customers (parents). These skills are extremely valuable in all aspects of working life.

Park League Official – My first job was as an official at the park league where I had previously been a player. A year round program I had the opportunity to be a referee and umpire for several sports. As an official I learned to make quick decisions, how to handle authority, peacemaking, and how to deal with difficult people. I found it one of the most challenging jobs I have ever held, because at the time I suffered from a great deal of self-doubt. The confidence that I learned through learning to wield these skills have paid dividends throughout my life.

Camp Counselor – Another great job I had at an early age was that of a camp counselor. Many of the same skills that one gains as a park league official are learned here as well, but often at a greater rate simply because one is learning for more hours in a day. Some opportunities are for day camps while others are for resident camps. I had the opportunity to work at a resident camp, which not only gave my parents a break from me, it gave me opportunities to experiment with independence as well as make stronger friendships, many of which thrive to this day. Two other great aspect of being a camp counselor is working as part of a team and being silly. I have found both skills to be invaluable in working with others and making my workplaces fun.

Tutor – Smart kids blessed with patience and good communication skills could be great tutors. Tutoring challenges young people to find different ways to convey information to students who are often reached in different ways. In addition, like all teachers can relate, dealing with personal frustration involved with turning on the light of understanding can be very challenging. Patience, understanding, and encouragement skills are gained through tutoring.

Entrepreneurship – Finally, more industrious kids can actually try to create the whole endeavor. There are many ways kids can find ways to practice entrepreneurship. World famous personal finance author, Robert Kiyosaki writes about how he and his best friend, at a young age, opened a comic book store for neighborhood kids and managed to secure a source of comics for free. Typical new businesses consist of lemonade stands, lawn mowing services and snow shoveling services. There is not better way to learn a wide variety of skills quickly than by starting a business. Children learn sales, managing equipment, customer service, procurement and a host of other concepts. In addition, much like in adulthood, often the rewards of being an young entrepreneur are much greater than a young employee.

There are undoubtedly other ways for children to enter the workforce. Getting children involved in earning money not only allows them to begin the process of financial liberation from Mom and Day, it also allows them to learn valuable skills that will help them throughout their lives.

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How Can Colleges Help More Students Land Good Jobs?

Since so many students have large college loans, they must be concerned about the employers and jobs that will be available to them when they graduate. Of course, that does not mean that the students who are not burdened with loans are not also concerned with landing good jobs. I've said this before, but it still holds true. In the end, most college students only want three things:

1. A good college education

2. An enjoyable college experience

3. A great job when they graduate

Unfortunately, there are colleges that have trouble achieving all three. Some colleges are known for academic excellence. Others offer large numbers of activities, clubs and parties. Only a few have a reputation for having systems in place to ensure that large numbers of students obtain well-paying jobs with desirable employers that will have advancement opportunities.

Until college leaders change their minds and place a greater value on student employment success, they will not change their behavior. Nobody can effectively change their behavior before they change their minds.

Skeptical leaders always resist change. It scares them. Change usually scares us all until we understand it and believe that the change will make things better for us. That is the challenge.

How can college leaders identify and understand the changes that will both result in greater student employment success and make things better for themselves? Money, manpower and time are issues that are always brought up. However, the most important factors are "wanting to make things better" and "looking for and identifying the things that have to be changed." Colleges that can't or won't do one or both of those things will never improve the employment success of their students.

To improve student employment success, colleges must:

1. Recognize that students are quite limited in their knowledge about job search preparation activities and what, how, when and why they should be done.

2. Accept the fact that the college (a learning institution) is where students spend most of their time and where they expect to receive the information, help and guidance they will need for their employment search.

3. Agree that job search preparation instruction and guidance is in large part the responsibility of the college as a whole, not just students and the people in Career Services.

4. Understand that students must compete against other candidates for the best jobs in their fields of interest. Simply having earned a degree with good grades is often not enough.

5. Believe that their college will benefit when larger numbers of students land desirable jobs with respected employers.

To Help Students Find Greater Employment Success, Colleges Should :

6. Help students identify and select a career direction that matches up with their capabilities and interests not later than their sophomore year. When students wait too long to identify a career direction, there may be little or no time left for clearly focused job search preparation activities. Late decisions may also require extra time in college and additional college loans.

7. In the 1st or 2nd year of college, ask students to purchase and read a book that explains the entire employment process, including job search preparation strategies and efforts. Career Services should suggest one.

8. Early on, require students to draft a personal budget for independent living after college. That will make them think about the coming expenses and give them an idea about the minimum starting salary they will require. A sample budget form can be supplied by Career Services, so students can fill in the blanks.

Having a realistic budget, will encourage students to determine two things: 1) Does the selected career direction have desirable entry level jobs that will meet their budget requirements? and, 2) Do those jobs have good growth potential and a career path?

Qualified students should not blindly enter careers and accept employment offers that make it too difficult for them to live on their own and pay back college loans or offer little salary and career growth potential.

9. Help students select a major and minor that will support their career direction and the jobs that are of interest.

10. Help students prepare a written plan of action that includes the activities and experiences they will participate in to make themselves more attractive to their target employers. Colleges can start by providing each student with a generic example of a step-by-step plan.

11. Offer job search preparation classes to students. These classes should cover every aspect of job search preparation, review the contents of the book that has been selected, help students build and utilize their job search network, create a résumé that is focused on accomplishments and successes and also help students develop the stories and examples they will use during interviews.

12. Have each student research and identify a group of jobs in their selected field of interest. (Having a clear target will make the following steps easier for students to achieve.)

13. Have each student research and identify a list of employers that will have opportunities for students with their own job interests. In that way, students can pursue opportunities with the specific employers that are of interest to them. In almost every case, students must chase employers not the reverse.

14. Help students identify the specific things that their target employers will need, want and expect of employment candidates. (Students are more attractive to their target employers when they have prepared for and addressed their needs, wants and expectations.)

15. Help students research, identify and retain lists of Job Banks, Search Firms and Web Sites that can be useful, as they conduct their searches for employment. Students with similar career directions can work together as a team and share their results. (Initial lists for students in every major should be available from Career Services.)

16. Coach and encourage students, as they execute their action plans. Every campus employee can help with this. In fact, everyone in the college community can help with this. However, college Alumni should be ideal for this aspect of job search preparation. That means that the college has to make a special effort to involve successful alumni in this process.

17. Work to build a larger and larger pool of employers that will provide part-time jobs, internships, co-op assignments, work-study programs and summer jobs for students in each and every major. Work experience and job performance are extremely important to interviewers and their hiring employers. Students with job-related work experience, highly rated job performance and solid work references will always attract attention from potential employers.

18. Work to build a larger and larger pool of respected employers that will visit the campus to recruit students. The goal should also be to find and invite a wide variety of employers so some will be interested in students with the less recruited majors. Many colleges are not good at finding employers that are interested in students from the less recruited majors. In fact, on every campus there will be students who don't have even one campus interview.

19. Develop a long list of employment opportunities for graduating students in every major by requiring everyone who is in any way associated with their institution (College Leaders, Professors, Administrators, Hourly Employees, Students, Parents, Alumni, Suppliers, Vendors, Local Employers and Community Leaders) to use their networks to identify jobs that pay well and have a substantial employee benefits package.

20. Help students pay close attention to their job search preparation activities, job performance and accomplishments. Students must be prepared to compete for the better paying jobs with career potential.

Job offers are not won or lost during interviews. They are earned in the 2nd, 3rd and 4th years of college. As students get involved, participate, perform, lead and work, they can take advantage of opportunities to demonstrate their capabilities and add to their list of impressive accomplishments. The best candidates talk about their performance and offer examples during interviews.

21. As students enter their senior year, they should be given multiple opportunities to participate in mock interviews. They will need to practice presenting their selling points, successes and accomplishments. When students tell compelling stories about their college and work experiences and performance, employers will pay attention.

These suggestions will result in a new culture on campus. Students who land great jobs will speak highly of the college and will be better able and more likely to make donations. Furthermore, as high potential applicants learn about the employment successes of your students, they will want to attend your college.

Student employment success is a win-win for students and colleges alike. That's why colleges should give more consideration to the efforts and services that will result in more and better jobs for their students.

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Teens, Jobs and School: The Pros and Cons

Most teens realize at a fairly young age the old adage that "money equals power." Money equals designer clothes, a car and insurance, and in many cases, a certain amount of freedom. And in order to get money, many teens get part-time jobs.

While the benefits and / or drawbacks of teens and part-time jobs have been researched, studied and debated since at least 1979, the teens, jobs and affects on schoolwork verdict is still out. According to the US Department of Labor, 50 percent of American teenagers hold informal jobs, such as babysitting or yard work, by age 12. And by age 15, nearly two-thirds of American teens have had some kind of employment. And many researchers, including those on government panels like the National Commission on Youth praise part-time work and say it contributes to the transition from youth to adulthood.

Parents and educators alike have, for decades, said that part-time jobs teach children how to be responsible and manage money. But Temple University researcher Laurence Steinberg found that only 11 percent of students report saving most of their money for college, and only three percent contribute to household living expenses. "The bulk of teen's money goes to clothing, cars, entertainment, and in some cases, drugs and alcohol," according to results of a study published in Harvard Education Letter in 1998.

Steinberg says, "Students who work longer hours report diminished engagement in schooling, lowered school performance, increased psychological distress, higher drug and alcohol use, higher rates of delinquency and greater autonomy from parental control." A 1997 study by David Stern, director of the National Research Center for Vocational Education at the University of California, Berkeley, proves Steinberg's viewpoint. In research conducted over 20 years, students who worked more than 15 hours per week had lower grades, did less homework, had higher dropout rates and were less likely to go to college than students who worked under 15 hours per week.

But Jerald Bachman at the University of Michigan's Monitoring the Future Project, warns not to jump to cause and effect conclusions. "I would argue that most of the problems that correlate with working long hours are more fundamentally caused," he says. "That may contribute the to spiral, but I think the spiral is well underway at the time they elect to work the long hours."

Though the drawbacks to a busy, part-time job are many, so are the benefits. A teenager's job can teach work skills that school does not, and it can instill in the teen new confidence, sense of responsibility and independence. Earning money will enable your teen to buy things and to manage money. An after-school job can also provide adult supervision, especially if you work longer hours than those in a typical school day. And the right job may provide networking possibilities and set your child on a rewarding lifetime career path.

But before your child gets a job, there are some things you should know. According to the Pennsylvania Department of Labor and Industry, "Minors under 14 years of age may not be employed or permitted to work in any occupation, except children employed on farms or in domestic service in private homes." Children under the age of 14 can also work on farms, be golf caddies, newspaper carriers or juvenile performers in the entertainment industry. But special permits may need to be required.

Also according to many state labor laws, teens aged 14 and 15 are not permitted to work more than four hours per day during the school year and not before 7 am or after 7 pm (During the summer, the amount of hours of work per day can be increased to eight.) Children under the age of 16 are prohibited, by Pennsylvania law, for example, from working in bowling centers (unless as snack bar attendants, scorers or control desk clerks), building heavy work, highway work, anywhere liquor is sold or dispensed, manufacturing, on scaffolds or ladders and window cleaning.

For 16 and 17 year olds, the some state laws say, "minors are not to work before 6 am or after midnight on school days and 1 am on Fridays and Saturdays." Also, not more than eight hours per day and 28 hours per school week. (During the summer, the only restrictions on 16 and 17 year olds, is that they can work no more than eight hours per day or 44 hours per week.) Young adults under the age of 18 are prohibited from working in billiard rooms; doing electrical work; operating elevators; performing crane and hoisting operations; excavating; operating machinery that does woodworking, bakery mixing, cleaning, oiling or punch pressing; roofing; welding; and doing demolition.

Your teen securing a job is a big step on the road to maturity. Be sure to discuss the pros and the cons with him or her. You may also want to agree to a job on a trial basis, such as "you can work x number of hours a week this grading period and then we will decide if you can keep working, based on your grades." Maintaining good grades, continuing extra curricular activities and keeping a social life will be important to your child's psychological health and development. Also, prepare a budget with your child, setting limits on spending and enforcing a percentage-of-paycheck-into-savings policy. Good money management skills, acquired when young, will last a lifetime. Part-time jobs can be a wonderful experience, with the right supervision and parental guidance.

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