Applause – A Motivation

“A little sound of applause makes a magical difference then a thousand rupee note”.

Motivation is a kind positive push, to a person to proceed further to achieve his wants and desire. In early 80’s and 90’s the term Motivation was not considered on higher terms neither it was used broadly. But as the time changed, people felt and saw the magic of motivation. It became a term which started being highly used in professional as well as personal lives. Motivation is one of those terms which has vast explanation and small meaning. It can be widely explore, reviewed and collected.

Motivation – in a broader sense

Motivation has to be started from the gate of an organisation, from the day one of the new entrant till his/her last day of the service. Motivation can be done at any stage of your service and employment. It does not have any connection to your designation. It is also viewed in two broad manners: self motivation and praise motivation. Self motivation is a motivation in which an employee get aspire from the surrounding and initiatives made or done in a nearby environment. It is one of the best ways to aspire the employee. As if an employee look that his fellow colleague is getting some extra attention or been rewarded in terms of Applause, appreciation letter or money etc by management and others, he automatically feels motivated to work in the same direction in which he could earn more credibility as others are gaining.

Motivation can be done in endless number of ways, but one should always remember that it should be done in right way and in right manner. Oftenly employees get motivated towards the wrong things,

for e.g. as if one employee is taking a leave without information which usually happens and management never bothers to take any action or does not acts on a such behavior, another employee gets motivated to do the same.

Mode of Motivation

As per stated above, motivation can be done by any mode. Like: –

Dreams are motivation – dreams are kind of motivation which can be seen unlimited by any one.

Praise is a motivation – simple words from your boss like VERY GOOD or GREAT WORK is a way of high effective motivation.

Shopping is a motivation – people are motivated to buy new thing while doing shopping.

Love – Love is a motivation which has the greatest impact to achieve the desires for your loved ones.

Success – one gets motivated to achieve the success so he/she makes his /her success a motivation.

Jealousy

Needs

Movies – entertainment

Sports

Relationships

Etc are many few of the ways of motivation.

Motivation – an adoption and a Satisfaction

Today, motivation is also a part of self appraisal, self esteem and behavioral posture.

Motivation = behavioral posture

Motivation = Self esteem

Motivation = Self appraisal

So many times we see and ask that why a human or an animal is engaged in certain or specific set of action (Criminals, actors, business, service etc)?

What is there motivation behind that action? Let me explain the answer.

Every human being has there own specific brain set. They like to indulge in what they believe and what they want to believe in. It is generally and commonly viewed that Doctor’s son will be a doctor; Lawyer’s son will be a lawyer. These are the norms which generally others think for others. As for example a son/daughter of a doctor will get the environment of his/her home different from a lawyers home. Parents want that there children should adopt the same profession in which they are involved in. So, the motivation from the environment and surrounding motivates a child to behave, adopt and act accordingly.

Motivation is also major part of self esteem. Self esteem makes you more confident and straight in your communication and thinking. People want to be motivated in order to increase their moral and want to be confident as others are. To boast up they motivate themselves to be confident to increase their self esteem. Same goes with self appraisal.

Self appraisal is a concerned sister of self esteem and again motivation is one of the big ways to achieve the sense of self appraisal.

For e.g. analysis of choosing what u want to wear?

I would like to present an example that will illustrate the utility of the type of motivational analysis illustrated in the article. Most of us enjoy dressing up even without any special occasion. What are favorite dresses? Colors – black, blue, orange etc? Jeans or trousers? Shirts or T-shirts? Long or minimal skirt? etc. When we dress up according to our own desire, we develop a sense of looking beautiful or handsome, which makes us more confident or increases are self esteem which lands us on the seventh level of sky. The feeling of getting noticed by the known and unknowns, getting compliments, being comfortable makes one flawing in the sky. The feeling of getting noticed by others motivates us to do the same again and again as it starts giving us immense pleasure and satisfaction which in turns boasts our confidence and increases our self esteem. Also a motivated, different and positive behavior can be seen in a satisfied person

Motivation – a sense of achievement.

So how can one create a better environment for himself and his employees? What can he do differently to motivate his employees? One very good answer is APPLAUSE. As stated above, applause is one of the best ways to motivate any human being especially if it is done in front of others/fellow colleagues/known ones. As if an employee performs well and his employer just visit his work desk with other high authority, surprisingly and applaud in there, front of others, team members, imagine……, the kind of satisfaction and credibility an employee earns. Such motivation is a push to an employee to achieve/gain his goals and targets towards his organization which is one of the best ways amongst other means of motivation. It is a human nature and it has been proven that human being does not earn for himself, he earns to show others. It is a nature of human being, that he is always hungry of praise; they are never satisfied to what they get, they always want more and more. So, by the feeling of being recognized amongst others eyes is a best way to attain credibility and for that Applause sprinkles the magic.

Conclusion

Before signing off once again I will say that motivation cannot be done only through rewarding an employee by not only giving money but a small sound of applause is more powerful.

To support my article I would like to include few quotations: –

o Watch a sunrise.

o People often say that motivation doesn’t last. Well, neither does bathing – that is why we recommend it daily.

o Desire creates the power.

o The ones who want to achieve and win championships motivate themselves.

o Inspirations never go in for long engagements; they demand immediate marriage to action.

With love and affection,

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Student Motivation

Student motivation refers to a student’s interest, desire, compulsion, and need to participate in and be successful in the learning process. It is generally accepted that student motivation plays a key role in academic learning.

Highly motivated students actively engage more in the learning process than less motivated students. Motivated students have a positive impact on learning. They take advantage of a given opportunity and show intense effort and concentration in the implementation of learning process. Also, they reveal positive emotions such as excitement, enthusiasm, interest, and optimism during learning.

On the other side, the less motivated were found to be less interested in participating in the learning process. Most of them were physically present in the class room but were mentally absent. They often failed to actively engage themselves in the learning tasks. Such students were more likely to stop learning. Less motivated students should be guided so as to develop a favorable attitude towards the learning process.

A teacher or an instructor has a significant role in guiding less motivated students. A technique called attribution retraining, which includes modeling, socialization, and practice exercises, is used to restructure less motivated students. Its aim is to help students to concentrate on the learning task without the fear of failure.

There are two types of student motivation such as extrinsic motivation and intrinsic motivation. Extrinsic motivation is defined as the motivation to engage in an activity in order to obtain rewards or to avoid punishments from an external source. Extrinsically motivated students undertake an activity for the sake of getting good grades or a teacher’s approval. Extrinsic motivation is again divided into two such as social motivation and material motivation. Social motivations include approval of teachers, parents, and friends. Good grades, future education, or job security come under material motivations.

Intrinsic motivation refers to engaging in an activity for its own sake, for the pleasure and enjoyment it provides. To be more precise, a student who is intrinsically motivated carries out an action for the learning it permits. Compared to extrinsic motivation, intrinsic motivation is more desirable as it is the motivation to engage in the learning process for the enjoyment of learning without considering its consequences.

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Two-Factor Motivation of Direct Support Professionals

Motivation of Direct Support Professionals (DSP’s) can be a daunting task. To examine ways to motivate DSP’s we can consider the two-factor theory. The psychologist Frederick Herzberg studied and theorized the motivational theory or the two-factor theory. The Motivational Theory further refines Maslow’s hierarchy of needs and applies to organizational motivation of employees.

The basic idea of the theory, however, is that there are various factors in our workplaces that increase satisfaction, as well as an equal amount of dissatisfaction. These two causes are independent of each other. Hertzberg conducted an experiment where employees were asked what made them happy and sad at work. Analyzing the list, he found, that the two factors were unconnected. In order to explain this further, he developed the motivation-hygiene theory. Here, the motivational factors were the ones that satisfied the employees, while the hygiene factors (one that involves maintenance) were the dissatisfactory ones.

Leading to satisfaction (motivation) were listed as the achievement, personal recognition, work itself, responsibility, advancement and growth needs. While the ones leading to dissatisfaction (hygiene) were: supervision, company policy, relationship with supervisor, work conditions, salary and relationship with coworkers. However, just because they are completely different from each other doesn’t mean that they are opposing elements. Thus from analysing all these factors, he found that an individual can satisfy the needs such as achievement, competency, personal worth as well as status. However, the absence of these factors needs not necessarily lead to dissatisfaction or unhappiness.

That is why the theory divides the factors into two separate sections. Hertzberg felt that when an individual performed a work related activity by his choice, when he wants to, it becomes “motivation”.

To answer what motivates DSP’s, we need to take a look at the hygiene factors listed out by Herzberg. If those issues are tackled by the management in the company one-by-one, then it automatically translates into an increased sense of motivation. Amongst these, pay, working conditions and job security and the overall job satisfaction feature as some of the most important factors that motivate employees within an organization.

Hygiene factors may not lead to increased motivation, but the absence of these factors will lead to dissatisfaction. Dissatisfied people leave employment in an attempt to meet their hygiene factors. Take, for example, pay. Organizations often say that pay does not motivate employee’s. Achievement, status and recognition is well known as motivating factors, but if hygiene needs are unmet, people will not likely be motivated. Reasonable compensation helps to provide for financial safety and security. Supervision, company policy, relationship with supervisor, work conditions, relationship with coworkers are important to employee satisfaction and money is just one part.

On a national average, DSP turnover rates exceed 70%. Pay hovers around federal minimum wage. Supporting people with intellectual and developmental disabilities can be a challenge, but it can also be a rewarding experience. Considering hygiene needs as means to stimulate motivation, just makes good business sense. Organization can accomplish this by applying a human perspective and emotional understanding.

DSP’s often end employment at one agency and hop to another. Obviously, they enjoy the type of work, so what are they searching for?

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Hypothalamus – Role in Motivation and Behaviour

“Behaviour is ultimately the product of the brain, the most mysterious organ of them all.” Ian Tattersall (from Becoming Human.Evolution and Human Uniqueness, 1998)

The question of why we are motivated to certain behaviours is perhaps one of the most fundamental in Psychology. Since Pavlov described conditioning in dogs in his famous 1927 paper, scientists have pondered the origins of motivations that drive us to action. For most of the early twentieth century, behaviourists like Watson & Skinner sought to explain behaviour in terms of external physical stimuli, suggesting that learned responses, hedonic reward and reinforcement were motives to elicit a particular behaviour. However, this does not tell the whole story. In the last few decades, the school of cognitive psychology has focused on additional mechanisms of motivation: our desires according to social and cultural factors having an influence on behaviour. Furthermore, recent advances in neuroimaging technology have allowed scientists an insight into the vast complexities and modular nature of specific brain regions. This research has shown that behaviours necessary for survival also have an inherent biological basis.

The biological trigger for inherent behaviours such as eating, drinking and temperature control can be traced to the hypothalamus, an area of the diencephalon. This article will explore the hypothalamic role in such motivated behaviours. It is important to note that a motivated behaviour resulting from internal hypothalamic stimuli is only one aspect of what is a complex and integrated response.

The hypothalamus links the autonomic nervous system to the endocrine system and serves many vital functions. It is the homeostatic ‘control centre’ of the body, maintaining a balanced internal environment by having specific regulatory areas for body temperature, body weight, osmotic balance and blood pressure. It can be categorised as having three main outputs: the autonomic nervous system, the endocrine system and motivated behavioural response. The central role of the hypothalamus in motivated behaviour was proposed as early as 1954 by Eliot Stellar who suggested that “the amount of motivated behaviour is a direct function of the amount of activity in certain excitatory centres of the hypothalamus” (p6). This postulation has inspired a wealth of subsequent research.

Much of this research has been in the field of thermoregulation. The body’s ability to maintain a steady internal environment is of critical importance for survivalas many crucialbiochemical reactions will only function within a narrow temperature range. In 1961, Nakayama et al discovered thermosensitive neurons in the medial preoptic area of the hypothalamus. Subsequent research showed that stimulation of the hypothalamic region initiated humoral and visceromotor responses such as panting, shivering, sweating, vasodilation and vasoconstriction. However, somatic motor responses are also initiated by the lateral hypothalamus. It is much more effective to move around, rub your hands together or put on extra clothes if you are feeling cold. Similarly, if you are too warm you might remove some clothing or fan yourself to cool down. These motivated behaviours demonstrate that in contrast to a fixed stimulus response, motivated behaviour stimulated by the hypothalamus has a variable relationship between input and output. This interaction with our external environment may be a ‘choice’, however it is clear that the motivation to make these choices has a biological basis.

The mechanics of thermoregulation can be explained by what is sometimes referred to as ‘drive states’. This is essentially a feedback loop that is initiated by an internal stimulus which requires an external response. Kendal (2000) defines drive states as “characterised by tension and discomfort due to a physiological need followed by relief when the need is satisfied”. The process begins with the input. Temperature changes are picked up from peripheral surroundings by thermoreceptive neurons throughout body which sense both warmth and cold separately. An electrical signal (the input) is then sent to the brain. Any divergence from what is known as the ‘set point’ – in this case a temperature of approx 37° – will then be identified as an ‘error signal’ by interoceptive neurons in the periventricular region of the hypothalamus. Armed with these measurements and temperature signals being relayed from the blood, the hypothalamus then launches an appropriate error response. This includes motivating behaviour to make a physical adjustment, e.g. to move around or remove surplus clothing in an attempt to control your temperature.

This type of feedback system in the body is common. Other systems necessary for survival such as regulation of blood salt and water levels are regulated in a similar way. However, the processes that motivate us to eat is much more complex.

Humans have evolved an intricate physiological system to regulate food intake which encompasses a myriad of organs, hormones and bodily systems. Furthermore, a wealth of experimental research supports the idea that the hypothalamus plays a key role in this energy homeostasis by triggering feeding behaviours. Controlling energy balance is of crucial importance and eating is primarily to maintain fat stores in the event of food shortage. If fat cell reserves in the body are low, they release a hormone called leptin which is detected as an error signal by the periventricular region of the hypothalamus. This then stimulates the lateral hypothalamus to initiate the error response. In this case, we start to feel hungry which in turns initates the somatic motor response by motivating us to eat.

Since the hypothalamus also controls metabolic rate by monitoring blood sugar levels, in theory we seem to have a similar feedback loop to temperature control. However in practice this is not a reality. The main difficulty in maintaining energy homeostasis is that motivation does not rise solely from internal biological influences. Cultural and social factors also play an important part in motivation about when, what and how often to eat. In western culture, social pressures to be thin can override the need to eat and in extreme cases like anorexia the drive state becomes reversed. The motivation is no longer to eat because they are hungry but is instead not to eat so they do feel hungry. This corruption of the reward system is well documented and is associated with delusions of body image, a concept which is also linked to the hypothalamus and the parietal lobe. Problems can also occur if an individual receives over stimulation to eat. The prevalence of obesity in today’s society is testament to this fact.

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Engagement Versus Motivation

Some experts advocate employee engagement, others are strong believers in motivational strategies. But one does not necessarily exclude the other. There can be circumstances where even an engaged employee can use some extra motivation. Having an overall engaged team should be the main goal of every leader. Engaged employees are a true asset for every organization, especially in difficult times. There is, however, quite some confusion about the difference between engagement and motivation.

Engagement

Engagement comes from ‘within’. It is having belief in the ’cause’. Engaged people do what they do because they believe it is the right thing to do and not necessarily because there is a reward waiting at the end. A prime example of engagement is volunteer work. There is no payment involved, it takes up a lot of time and it is very often ungrateful work. Yet most volunteers do it with passion and perseverance. Why? Because they believe in what they do. Engagement has everything to do with commitment.

Motivation

Here is where the confusion starts. When we talk about motivation, we distinguish two different kinds: intrinsic and extrinsic motivation.

Intrinsic motivation is in fact exactly the same as engagement. It comes from ‘within’ and it has to do with the joy or fulfillment a certain job or task gives the person, rather than the reward it will bring.

Extrinsic motivation is triggered by external factors. As soon as those factors don’t exist anymore, the motivation will be gone as well.

The opponents against motivation strategies are against extrinsic motivational measures like incentives and reward programs and they are absolutely right. Reward programs are counter productive; they usually have a negative return-on-investment in terms of money, employee satisfaction and retention.

What is there against Reward Programs?

Let me share my own experience with you. I started my career as a sales rep for a company that sold copiers, faxes and printers. As often the case, we got paid a commission on top of our – quite low – base salary. On top of that, the company had a few ‘reward programs’ running. A program for the most sold units in a given period, a program for the most ‘new business’ and a few more like these.

The worst one was the ‘Sales Person of the Month Award’. The one with the most sales in a particular month could hand in the keys to his company car and was allowed to drive the company’s Porsche Carrera the following month AND he got his own parking spot in front of the building.

What do these reward programs bring? Nothing, really. Guess who always won these rewards? Correct, the people who were always in the top already. Guess who didn’t even try to get one of these rewards? Correct again, the ones at the bottom. They knew up front that they would not stand a chance against the top performers. And guess who tried a few times but never got the ‘prize’ and became de-motivated? Right, the people in the middle.

So was it motivating? For sure it was, for the group who didn’t need to be motivated; the top performers. They might have sold a bit more but once you are at the top, the room for improvement becomes smaller and smaller. It didn’t do a thing for the bottom performers. They were ‘untouched’ by these programs. It did do a lot for the group in the middle though. That is the group where every sales manager can ‘score’. They have potential and a lot of room for improvement. And what did it do? Exactly the opposite of what the program was invented for. They knew that they contributed to the company and they saw that they would never get ‘rewarded’ for their contribution. How motivating is that?

I hear some people say already:”Then they should make it to the top! Then they will get the rewards as well!” I can score 110% of my target but if other people score 115%, does that make me ‘average’? No, it doesn’t. No matter how great your group of sales people is, there will always be a number one and a number last. And reward programs will always reward the numbers one, the people who need it the least.

Extrinsic motivators: short-term strategy

Incentives and reward programs ‘motivate’ only for as long as the program lasts or even shorter if the employee feels that he won’t ‘win’.

Suppose you have installed a reward for producing a certain number of your product and suppose that everybody is really trying hard. What happens after the deadline? Exactly. People will fall back to their normal production. To get the same results, you’ll have to install another reward program and so on.

Engagement: long-term strategy

Let’s look at that last example again. Suppose one of your suppliers has delivery problems and therefore your production comes to a halt for a certain period of time and nobody will meet the target for the reward. People that were motivated will not pick up the pace right after the supplier started delivering again, because there is no reward to work for anymore.

There is a group of people who will pick up the pace, despite of the fact that there will be no reward. They have an attitude of ‘let’s see what we can do to make up for the lost time’. They are in the ‘game’ for the ‘game’ and not for the ‘prize’. They are engaged.

Engaged employees have endurance. They will continue to bring the task to a good end, despite external challenges and circumstances. They support the goals, mission and values of the company and being part of the organization makes them feel proud. In general, the quality of their work is better. They want to be able to be proud of what they have done while motivated people are like horse with blinders, trying to get to the finish as fast as possible, no matter how.

Engagement goes deep. That also means that the management of an organization has to create an environment where engagement can thrive and flourish. In my next post I will share my thoughts on what you can and have to do to create an engaged team around you.

Let me conclude with a story I heard that describes engagement the best:

Former U.S. President John F. Kennedy came up with a very bold statement in September 1962: “We are going to the moon.” Not too long thereafter he paid NASA a visit. While he was there. he asked an employee:”What is your job?”. The man answered:”My job is to put a man on the moon.” He turned out to be the janitor.

That is ‘engagement’. No matter what you do, your work is as important as anybody’s as contribution to the mutual goal.

I wish you a lot of engagement.

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Speaking for Motivation: Top Traits of Successful Motivational Speakers

This article will do 2 things for you:

1. Briefly talk about some common (but pretty funny) stereotypes of motivational speakers. We’ll take a look at a few real-life examples from the huge variety of motivational speakers on the circuit today.

2. Give some great tips on how to give your own motivational speeches by exploring the top 6 key ingredients that successful motivational speakers have in common.

The end goal of this article is to help empower you to create and deliver your own inspiring motivational speeches so that you can go forward and help others make positive changes in their own lives.

SPEAK IT OUT LOUD

When someone starts talking about motivational speakers, most people either:

  1. Bring up their own favourite speakers and share how said speaker(s) changed their life, or

  2. Roll their eyes and groan.

… More often than not, people do the latter.

When it comes to stereotypes, motivational speakers seem to get the blunt end of the stick. Often perceived as frantic, loud, and in-your-face, this type of public speaking commonly gets dismissed for being, well, all talk.

However, there is a very definite (and growing) fan-base for motivational presentations. After all, the words of inspiration and insight that a truly good motivational speaker shares can create the kind of “a-ha” moments that truly resonate!

Inciting positive changes for everything from kicking bad habits to pursuing your dreams and living the life you’ve imagined – quality speakers can motivate their audiences to realize the inner potential for success that lives within all of us.

The fact is that a strong motivational speaker can be a real force to be reckoned with, regardless of what your own personal opinion of them may be!

DIFFERENT SPEAKERS. DIFFERENT APPROACHES. SAME POINT.

Truly good, established motivational speakers command some pretty decent coin – Tony Robbins, for example, charges at least $100,000 per engagement.

The rationale for this is that good motivators can impact the lives of thousands in a single presentation, creating a literally exponential return on investment.

But the tactics they use to inspire are often drastically different, so how do they all end up achieving the same impact?

Let’s take a look at the very different styles of 3 top motivational speakers to figure this out.

– Tony Robbins: Energetic Motivation

Tony Robbins’ high-energy, high-volume, and high-audience participation presentations have inspired millions to pursue their dreams. He literally gets attendees out of their seats, hyped up and boldly yelling out affirmational mantras of success together.

The end result is a crowd of inspired go-getters who are ready to “ask better questions, and as a result get better answers” – answers that will (hopefully) help them navigate the path to success and happiness.

– Dr. Roberta Bondar: Intelligent Inspiration

Other speakers, like the amazing and super smart astronaut Dr. Roberta Bondar, choose to share their motivational public speeches with more intimate audiences in specific niches and settings.

Dr. Bondar’s approach is noticeably very different to Tony Robbins’; her presence and spoken words are significantly calmer and her talks tend to keep the decibels at more ear-friendly levels. But her message consistently inspires people to pursue their “peak performance potential” as she drops pearls of wisdom and dishes out food for thought.

– Steve Rizzo: Hilariously Helpful

Yet other speakers rely on comedy to deliver their message, like the hilarious Steve Rizzo. Having walked away from his career as a comedian who shared the stage with greats like Jerry Seinfeld and Rodney Dangerfield, Steve uses his sharp comedic timing to deliver messages of perseverance through adversity that inspire crowds to “live the dream.” For Steve, laughter is the best motivation.

When you boil it all down, successful motivational speakers come in all shapes and styles – but they all manage to inspire their audiences to make positive, impactful changes in their lives.

They do this by finding their own presentational style and playing to it. In figuring out what works best for them and using it to their advantage, they successfully add an air of authenticity to their talks. And this authenticity is crucial.

After all, nobody wants to listen to someone who doesn’t earnestly, 1000% believe in what they’re preaching!

Like top motivational speaker booking agent, Rich Libner of MCP Speakers, says when talking about his own roster of speakers on the circuit,

“It’s important to remember that motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Roberta Bondar, or Steve Rizzo are not much different from the rest of us. They all have fears, failures, difficulties, and dirty dishes.”

So if they can speak to and inspire crowds of people, then you can too!

WHAT TO SAY AND HOW TO SAY IT

Believe it or not, there is a basic recipe for creating and delivering a successful motivational speech.

No matter if you decide to use the over-the-top energetic approach of Mr. Robbins or the comedic delivery of Steve Rizzo, following these key ingredients will help you on your path to motivational speaking success.

  1. Tell a good story, and tell it well.

Our evolutionary history has predisposed us to loving a good story.

Consider this: Every known culture in human history has stories. From sitting by a fire and listening as elders tell stories of gods & monsters to buying a movie ticket and immersing ourselves in some epic cinematic experience – we, as a species, absolutely love a good story. We always have.

Tap into this love to get and keep your audience’s attention. A good story uses a recognizable pattern to convey meaning, with the most common pattern being the classic failure-epiphany-struggle-success plot…

Know it. Love it. Use it.

  1. Be clear with what you’re talking about.

Nobody likes to hear someone yammer on with no easy-to-spot point. Much like Charlie Brown’s teacher, public speakers that drone on with no clear intent or purpose quickly lose their audience’s attention and become background noise.

Keep it snappy and on-point. Let your audience know within the first 2 minutes why you’re talking to them and what you’re talking about. After that, make sure that every anecdote, story, and tip you tell directly relates back to your purpose for being there.

In other words, give them a roadmap for what to expect from your presentation – and stick to it!

  1. Create your own buy-in.

Picking up on point number 2, a good way of creating your own buy-in is to let your audience know what to expect from the get-go. Tony Robbins is a master of this, often starting his speaking presentations with the following formula:

Today, I will talk to you about _______. I’m talking to you about it because ________. My goal at the end is to motivate you to ________ so that you can ________. [-> Enter engaging but simple question to cap your intro and spur audience participation here.]

You don’t have to copy that exact formula, but hopefully you get the idea.

After setting out your roadmap, one of the best ways of further fostering audience buy-in is by encouraging participation. There are more ways to encourage audience interaction than this article can list, but a key point is to make sure that the participation is guided and relevant (and safe!)

For ideas on ways to foster positive audience participation, just Google “audience participation”.

  1. Stay positive.

The #1 very best way to alienate your audience is by being a downer. This includes singling out someone to pick on throughout your presentation, relating horrible things that happened to people without providing a positive spin or ending, and generally being a low-energy Debbie downer.

The key to motivation – especially motivational speaking – is to stay positive. People are paying attention to you because they’re after some sort of positive change, so stay positive with your motivational messaging!

  1. Offer a different way of looking at things.

A fundamental ingredient to creating positive change is to alter the way you look at things.

Like famous motivational speaker Wayne Dyer once said, “Change the way you look at things and the things you look at change.”

… Pretty deep, right?

It’s also 100% true. Psychologists and marketers alike have known for decades that the biggest way to effect positive change is foster a positive perspective. From addiction treatments to brand allegiance, the power of altering a person’s perspective is undeniable.

Inspire your audience to look at things differently by sharing a different (and positive) lens through which to view life’s challenges and hardships.

  1. Practice. Practice. Practice.

… Then practice some more.

Polished motivational speeches don’t happen overnight and even top-notch motivational pros still flub every-so-often. Practice makes perfect though, so practice for perfection!

MOTIVATING SUSTAINED MOTIVATION

In the end, the most motivational part of any inspirational speech is what the audience chooses to do with what they’ve just heard. So help them make the right choice by using the above 6 tips the next time you decide to get up and speak sweet words of inspiration!

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Motivation – Starting Is the Hardest Part

Most people on this earth struggle with motivation, maybe even on a daily basis. Sometimes we just don’t have the energy. Sometimes tasks seem overwhelming. Sometimes we tell ourselves that we can postpone doing the things we need to do- that they aren’t necessary at the moment. Whatever our excuse, it feels SO MUCH BETTER to actually make progress with our goals. Even if it’s just the tiniest bit of hedge-way, doing something ALWAYS feels better than doing nothing.

In my years of experience grappling with the motivation/procrastination balance, I’ve found a few tricks to help me do the things I need to do. Hopefully you’ll find these tips as helpful in your life as they have been in mine!

1. Get organized

Making lists of what you need to do can help you see if there’s something you can take care of right away, or if you need to accomplish a few little things before you can tackle a harder task. It also makes your goals more manageable. Crossing something off of my To Do List after I’ve finished it feels extremely satisfying!

2. Just start something

Honestly some days after I get home from work, I just don’t feel like doing anything productive. The trick for me is to recognize the difference between being tired and being physically exhausted. If I’m exhausted, it’s better for me to rest and recuperate. If I’m just tired, then doing something useful actually gives me more energy and boosts my morale. So I try to just start doing things that need done. The other day, for example, I really didn’t feel like cleaning up, but my house begged to differ. So I started with something I like doing, and before I knew it I was cleaning things without even thinking about it. I emptied the dishwasher. I wiped off the counters. I organized the pantry. I took out the trash and the recycling. I was actually cleaning on autopilot, lost in my own thoughts and not even noticing how much work I was really accomplishing, when just minutes before I was considering lying down for a quick nap!

3. Acknowledge your accomplishments

I think this is a really important step that a lot of us are guilty of skipping. Sometimes we get so caught up in what we haven’t yet done that we forget to feel good about the things we have done. It’s so very important to acknowledge the positive things in our lives, no matter how small they may seem. When we gain confidence from recognizing what we’ve already done, it can give us the energy and motivation to tackle the harder tasks in our lives.

4. It doesn’t hurt to delegate

We are so centered on ourselves sometimes that we forget that it’s OK to ask for help. It’s definitely OK to ask your friends and family for assistance, and as long as you aren’t asking way too much, I promise you they’ll be very likely to want to help out. Don’t put the whole burden on yourself if you don’t have to!

5. The Twenty-Minute Trick

There are often times when the last thing in the world I want to do is the one thing I really need to get done. For me, it’s usually housework, paperwork, or making important phone calls. Then a friend of mine shared a tip that they found to work wonders for their own motivation- the Twenty Minute Trick. The thing is, it’s not all that hard to dedicate twenty minutes to a task. So when you find yourself unable to start on a particular task, set a timer for twenty minutes. When that time is up, feel free to stop. You’ve worked hard and accomplished a goal! Often times, however, I find myself ‘getting into the groove,’ and I don’t feel like stopping when the timer goes off. This trick has gotten me through a lot of motivation-lacking days!

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What Should an Adult Figure Skater Do to Recover Their Motivation and Passion?

In a previous article, I discussed what to do when you stop making improvement or just have one of those days when nothing seems to be working. So what should an adult figure skater do on a day like this? Remind yourself that bad days happen to everyone, young and old, regardless of level of skill.

Some days, it’s hard to get going for no real good reason other than I am feeling lazy, and sitting in the sun or on the sofa would be preferable. The hardest part is driving into the parking lot and asking yourself “what on earth are you doing here?” or “How are you going to survive the next two hours?” or “you’re cold, you have dishes to wash…” or “The car is so nice and warm; there’s a huge shopping mall half a mile away….”. Would milady like some cheese to go with that whine?

The first five minutes on the ice is the worst; I’m cold and uncoordinated. Somewhere in there, I transition away from stiff, cranky old lady to totally happy and comfortable old lady. The first five minutes seems to last two hours and the next 115 pass in five minutes!

So what should an adult figure skater do when this happens? Remind yourself it’s only five minutes!!

The same thing happens at competitions: “What are you doing here? It’s a Saturday! What if you crash and burn? You’re up against the kids (well, usually they are 16-18 years old); they will make fun of you.”

Remind yourself that as soon as you walk into the arena, the adrenaline will hit and brain and body will remember that they’ve got a job to do. Your family is off doing their Saturday activities and are looking after themselves quite nicely; don’t worry (my older child even sends me encouraging text messages now).

As for the “kids”, once they get past the initial shock of realizing that I’m not some skater’s Mom or coach, they are intrigued and enthusiastic. I’ve had some nice conversations with competitors in their early twenties who feel they are at the end of their competitive career through a combination of injuries, reduced training time, due to school or work, or having ceased to improve their skating skills.

Few of them ever realized that adult figure skating is growing and there will be many chances for them to continue in the sport for as long as they want to and that they can continue setting and achieving personal goals. Often, their coaches don’t even realize how many opportunities are out there in adult figure skating. This is essentially the reason for my website.

So what should an adult figure skater do in this situation? Get the message out! There is no need to give up on your passion just because you are past a certain age!!

Everything happens for a reason, the good days and the discouraging ones. Overall, the training is going well and the next competition is several weeks from now, so no need to panic (yet!). I have time; strictly speaking, I don’t have to “peak” until the Adult World Championships in May. Although at my age, I’d settle for an “upward trend.”

How do you get motivated on the blah days? What kinds of self talk do you use to get past the times of discouragement?

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How Math Video Games Can Boost Motivation to Learn

In the above said study the researchers had offered students a math video game to try their hands on. When the children played the video game collaboratively or competitively with a fellow player they automatically adopted a mindset of mastery which is highly conducive to learning, as opposed to when they were playing the game alone. It was also noticed that keenness and enjoyment of students when they played children’s educational video games increased when they played with another student.

The finding of this study has been published in the Journal of Educational Psychology and elaborates how gaming consoles, computers and mobile-based education can yield increased learning benefits.

One of the lead authors of the study, Professor Jan Plass stated that they have found ample support for well-designed math video games that they can act as effective tools for teaching students subjects that are usually less popular amongst kids. All forms of game-based learning piques the students’ interest about that subject with broadening their interests beyond the aim of just collecting points or stars.

By putting interactive educational tools to use in classrooms such as a free educational game for children which can help to improve the plaguing problems inside a typical classroom environment, which puts students in a mindset for appearing smart rather than being interested in learning.

Two main types of motivational orientations were primarily identified among students when they were engrossed in playing educational video games – the mastery motivation of achieving a goal, where kids focus on learning and developing new skills and the second being, performance-based goal orientation in which the children focus on validating their skills. So, if we consider this scenario in a classroom then students may either be interested to get better at the game (better at math) while playing or may be interested in trying to prove that they are smart or trying to avoid looking incompetent from their peers, thus enhancing performance based motivation.

While the design and content of the video games are important factors that strongly impact on the beneficial outcomes from the game but the positive result from these studies definitely showcase that gamification of education can have a significant positive impact in learning.

Some forward looking thinkers even contend that education through games hold the key to the salvation of the concept of learning- from instruction to true education. But these are predictions only and it is time that will decide what we make out of this promising new medium.

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Entrepreneurship Motivation

Wherever you go and whatever you do, nobody can deny that motivation always has a direct impact on a person’s overall productivity. Similarly like any other human being, entrepreneurs can succumb to the evil of procrastination and laziness even if they are so passionate in what they are doing. That is why it is highly important that entrepreneurship motivation is present within a business to keep the entrepreneurs motivated. This article provides information on how networking can be a great source of motivation as an entrepreneur.

One major reason why entrepreneurs should network amongst each other is because there is a need for business comparisons in terms of performance. You can never know how you are faring if you do not check on your competition every once in a while. That is why it is highly recommended that you start looking at how your competitors perform and compare their results with yours. You can start by making research studies such as public exposure, how well your target market knows your brand, what they have to say about your business and which brand they prefer when it comes to their needs.

Networking as an entrepreneur is a great way to keep up with each other through brainstorming and idea-sharing. These days, it is hard to find an entrepreneur that has the same mindset such as you and no entrepreneur would want to receive motivating words from someone who does not know what they do. If you start networking today, you are able to keep your entrepreneurial mind polished and at the same time, share ideas and thoughts with your fellow entrepreneurs. Networking is a good choice if you want to achieve your goals in the long run because of the entrepreneurship motivation it provides.

You can start networking with fellow entrepreneurs in many ways. Social networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter are great means to connect with entrepreneurs that share the same mindset as you do. Aside from being able to use these tools to connect with newly met entrepreneurs, there is also much functionality to keep your relationships going strong. Keep in mind though that you are trying to build relationships with these people. Hold off the sales pitches you have in mind for your products and services for now.

Emails and phone calls are a more personal level of approaching these people. That is because these mediums of communication are often used to discuss agendas with business people or setting appointments with them. Nonetheless, these are great choices in gaining a more personal relationship with entrepreneurs of the same mindset as you.

You can also start joining local events, conferences and seminars in order to meet entrepreneurs face-to-face. When it comes to networking with other entrepreneurs, meeting them in person is the best way that you can get. You can also start talking about future appointments if they like you in person. Start your entrepreneurship motivation goal now by networking with entrepreneurs that shame the same interests as you.

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